navigation
Bio Home
Airshow Bio
Military Bio
AFROTC Bio
Aircraft Flown
Sitemap
Ed Hamill Qualified Aircraft

Dream Machine : (currently qualified)
The Dream Machine is a factory built biplane designed and first built by Curtis Pitts over fifty years ago. This biplane design was inspired and modeled after the very first airplane designs, including two wings, fly wires and fabric covering. This design can be seen in aerobatic competitions today as well as airshows all over the world. The biplane design captures the true romance of what airshows are all about.

The Dream Machine can be changed from one seat to two seat configuration by swapping the canopies. The transformation can be made rather quickly, allowing for more versatility for both airshow performances and media rides. The single place canopy improves the performance by reducing drag and increasing the accellaration. Aside from a handheld GPS used for cross country flights, the instruments are your basic airspeed, altitude and engine monitoring guages. The overall design and mission of this beautiful machine is purely stick and rudder skydancing.

See more photo's in our gallery

Dream Machine

F16: (currently qualified)
The prototype YF-16 (#72-1567) was rolled out at Fort Worth on December 13, 1973 and was air freighted by C-5A to Edwards AFB on January 8, 1974. Ed Hamill currently instructs in the F-16 at Luke AFB, AZ. Ed is a member of the 301st Fighter Squadron, 944th Fighter Wing and is attached to the 309th Fighter Squadron for flying duties.

See more photo's in our gallery

F16

Beechcraft Bonanza:
Beechcraft Bonanza set the standard for the stylish yet well-equipped aircraft for the private pilot. Since its introduction in 1947, the Bonanza has been admired as a “classic” in the aviation world, even earning Fortune magazine's prestigious award in 1959 as one of the 100 best designed mass-production products. Ed Hamill first flew the Bonanza in 1997, taking short trips from Arizona to California and Nevada.

See more photo's in our gallery

Beechcraft Bonanza

Cessna 182:
The Cessna 182 is a powerful touring aircraft with excellent short field capabilities. This has made the 182 very popular with rural. A four seat aircraft, the 182 is a simple to fly aircraft that is ideal for sightseeing with its high wing design. Ed Hamill currently flies the C-182 for short trips from Arizona to California and Nevada.

See more photo's in our gallery

Cessna 182

Piper Cherokee:
The Piper PA-28 Cherokee 181, better known as Archer II, has become one of Piper's best selling General Aviation Aircraft and has been on the market since the early '60s. Ed Hamill accumulated many hours in the PIper Dakota, which has 235 hp. Ed flew this aircraft mostly out of Orange County/ John Wayne Airport, CA and Montgomery Field, San Diego, CA.

See more photo's in our gallery

Piper Cherokee

Piper Warrior:
A staple craft in flight training facilities around the world, the fixed-gear Warrior is a simple, stable and dependable primary plane that’s fun and easy to fly and land. Ed Hamill began is flying career in the Warrior. Starting his Private Pilot's license training in Atalanta, GA, Ed accumulated many hours in this wonderful aircraft.

See more photo's in our gallery

Piper Warrior

Seminole:
The PA-44 Seminole was developed during the heyday of the GA industry in the mid to late 1970s. Ed Hamill first checked out in this aircraft in 1992, obtaining his Multi Engine rating shortly after completing Euro Nato Joint Jet Pilot Training, Shepard AFB, TX. Even though the T-38 Talon is a twin engine jet, that training and subsequent civilian rating does not qualify for the Seminole or similar propellar driven twins. There are some significant differences that require additional training and ratings to be qualified in a twin engine propellar aircraft.

See more photo's in our gallery

Seminole

Sundowner:
Beechcraft developed the Musketeer family as a lower cost, lower performance four seater below its Bonanza, which would compete with the Cessna 172 and Piper Cherokee. Ed Hamill completed his Private PIlot training in this aircraft.

See more photo's in our gallery

Sundowner

MD Super 80's:
In 1977, Douglas developed an airplane, which should replace the older DC-9. They called it DC-9 "Super 80". McDonnell Douglas developed then still further variants: The MD-81, -82, -83, -87 and MD-88. All versions differs only with the engines, the take-off weights, the avionics and the fuel capacity.

See more photo's in our gallery

MD Super 80's